Brussels Light Opera Company

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (29 May – 1 June 2009)

Brussels Light Opera Company presents

De Bosuil, Jesus Eik  29 May – 1 June

Stephen Sonheim’s music and lyrics recount the hilarious tale of a Roman slave named Pseudolus and his attempts to win his freedom by helping his young master woo the girl next door. Zany vaudevillian nonsense, plot twists, turns and roundabouts make Forum one of the most loved Broadway hits of all time.

 

BLOC: Guys and Dolls (18-21 November 2010)

BLOC proudly presents GUYS AND DOLLS, November 18-21
A Musical Fable of Broadway coming to Brussels

The Brussels Light Opera Company (BLOC) will present a new production on
18-21 November at the Audergham Cultural Centre of GUYS AND DOLLS, Frank
Loesser’s magnificent musical comedy about rolling the dice and falling in
love.

With its classic score of unforgettable show tunes, including “Luck Be a
Lady Tonight,” “Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ The Boat,” “Adelaide’s Lament,”
and the wonderful title song, GUYS AND DOLLS is the quintessential New
York City musical.

 

BLOC: Three penny opera (4-7 May ’11)

 
Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s most celebrated theatrical collaboration, The Threepenny Opera, still packs all the punch that knocked Berlin audiences for six in its record-breaking opening run as the decadent twenties drew to a close.

The beggars’ gangmaster Jeremiah Peachum’s daughter Polly is snatched from under his roof by arch villain and serial seducer Captain Macheath. From that point on, the businessman’s unstoppable pursuit of revenge is set on a collision course with the womaniser’s irresistible charm, while corruption in high places ensures the meek  stand little chance of inheriting the earth. All London’s lowlife, beggars, whores and thieves, parade before us as justice, rough or poetic according to taste, is done.

Brecht’s biting political perspective, set against Weill’s striking jazz arrangements redolent of the Berlin dance band and cabaret traditions, prompted theatre critic, Kenneth Tynan to conclude: “It sets reality to music.” As Macheath, our anti-hero, is about to mount the steps to the gallows, he asks, “Who is the greater criminal: he who robs a bank or he who founds one?” Surely a play deserving of a revival!